Menu
Housing & Communities Planning for the Future Death & Estates Health Older Adults Consumer Protection Non-Profit Organizations & Charities Debts & Credit Government Agencies Courts & Legal Systems Crimes & Fines Victims Legal Information for Teachers Legal Information for Newcomers Family Law Saskatchewan About PLEA Contact Us Search

Release after Arrest

Following an arrest and criminal charges, you may be released immediately, from the police station or following a court appearance.

Release by Police

If you are arrested without a warrant and the crime you are charged with is not murder or another very serious crime, the police will release you unless it is likely that …

  • you are not giving the police your correct name and address
  • you will not go to court on your court date
  • you will commit other crimes before your court date
  • you will try to get rid of evidence of the crime after they release you
  • you will threaten witnesses who may be giving evidence against you

Depending on your circumstances, there are a variety of ways you may be released.

Summons or Appearance Notice – A document telling you where and when you have to appear in court.

Promise to Appear – A document you sign agreeing to appear in court on a certain date and time.

Recognizance without Deposit – You agree to pay up to $500 if you do not appear in court but do not have to actually pay the money into court.

Recognizance with Deposit – You agree to pay up to $500 if you do not appear in court and deposit the money with the court. This can only be required by the police if you live out of the province or more than 200 km from where you were arrested.

If you are arrested with a warrant and the crime you are charged with is not murder or a very serious offence, the police can also release you by any of these means. If you are arrested with a warrant the police can also require you to sign an undertaking with conditions. These conditions can include…

  • remaining in the area
  • notifying police of any change in address or employment
  • not communicating with certain people or going to certain places
  • reporting to the police
  • depositing your passport
  • not drinking or taking drugs
  • not possessing any firearms

Bail Hearings

If the police keep you in jail, you will get a bail hearing before a judge or a Justice of the Peace (JP). If a JP or judge is available the police must bring you before a one as soon as possible, and in any event, no later than 24 hours after your arrest. If a JP or judge is not available within 24 hours, the police must bring you before one “as soon as possible” (even if it is more than 24 hours later).

If you are being held by the police they help you call what is called the Brydges Line. You will get legal advice over the phone. There is no cost for this service and it is available for anyone being held by the police.

More information about bail hearings is available here.

How helpful was this article? *

PLEA can provide you with information to help you understand many legal matters you, a family member or friend may be facing.

Have a question?

ASK US We're here to help.

Housing & Communities

Planning for the Future

Death & Estates

Health

Older Adults

Consumer Protection

Non-Profit Organizations & Charities

Debts & Credit

Courts & Legal System

Government Agencies

Crimes & Fines

Victims

About PLEA

PLEA gratefully acknowledges our primary core funder the Law Foundation of Saskatchewan for their continuing and generous support of our organization.