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Traffic Tickets

You may receive an Offence Notice if you are stopped for a traffic violation, such as speeding. You may also receive one through the mail. For example, if your vehicle was caught speeding or going through a red light by a traffic camera.

For some traffic offences you may receive a Summons. These are usually issued in-person by a police officer. You can also receive a summons if you are charged with a bylaw offence and you do not pay the fine within the set time.

Options

Pay the ticket before the court date.

  • In some cases there may be a voluntary pay option that is a reduced amount if paid before a certain date.

Plead guilty but ask the court to lower the fine or give you more time to pay based on personal circumstances.

  • You can only do this with an Offence Notice, not a Summons
  • You can do this by appearing in court on the court date in the Notice.
  • If you cannot appear that day you can fill out the “Plea of Guilty” part of the Offence Notice and mail it to the court at least 30 days before your court date.
  • The court will then send you a new court date.

Plead not guilty.

  • If you received an Offence Notice and you cannot make it to court on the date set out in the notice you can fill out the “Plea of Not Guilty” form that is part of the ticket.
  • You must mail it to court at least 30 days before the court date if you want to change the court date.
  • In all other cases you must appear in court on the court date set out in the Summons or the Offence Notice.
  • A trial date will be set. This will be weeks or months away. This gives both you and the prosecutor time to prepare and arrange for any required witnesses. You can talk to the prosecutor’s office at 306.787.5490 about your case.

Doing nothing is not an option. You will face consequences that are more serious than the traffic offence you are charged with.

  • If you do nothing about an Offence Notice a late payment charge will be added to the fine. If you fail to pay the fine plus the late payment charge your driver's license can be suspended and/or you may not be able to renew it.
  • If you do nothing about a Summons a warrant can be issued for your arrest. You can also be charged with the offence of failing to appear. The case can go ahead without you. You can be convicted and required to pay a fine without being there. Unpaid fines are sent to a Collection Agency and/or the Canada Revenue Agency.

If you plead not guilty a trial date will be set. This will be weeks or months away. This gives both you and the prosecutor time to prepare and arrange for any required witnesses. You can talk to the prosecutor’s office at 306.787.5490 about your case.

Errors on a Ticket

Many errors on a traffic ticket can be corrected by the court if a ticket is challenged. This includes things like your name being misspelled, incorrect address, wrong drivers’ license number or license plate. The ticket does however have to clearly state what offence you are charged with.

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PLEA gratefully acknowledges our primary core funder the Law Foundation of Saskatchewan for their continuing and generous support of our organization.