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Health

Health care treatment is provided by health care professionals and includes surgical and dental treatment, any procedure undertaken for the purpose of diagnosis, any procedure undertaken for the purpose of preventing any disease or ailment, and any related actions. Common examples include...

  • identifying and responding to an illness
  • hospital care
  • home care (for example, visits by a nurse)
  • physiotherapy
  • illness prevention (for example, immunization)

Accessing Health Care

Understanding how to access health care, who can provide health care, your options, your rights and your responsibilities, can help ensure you receive quality care.

Consent to Medical Treatment

Patients must give consent to medical treatment. There are rules about what makes consent valid, including specific rules about consenting to medical assistance in dying. If someone cannot give consent another person can be appointed to give consent for them.

Medical Treatment Without Consent

Without proper consent, most medical care would be considered as a civil or even criminal assault. Additionally, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms gives people the right to security of the person, which includes the right to be free from unwanted medical treatment. There are, however, some exceptions.

HIV & AIDS

HIV, or the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is the virus that causes AIDS, or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Because it can pass from person-to-person through things such as having unprotected sex or sharing needles there are rules about testing and disclosure. There are also laws that provide protection for people with HIV or AIDS against discrimination.

Privacy & Access to Health Records

When you give information to your doctor or other health care provider they must keep it confidential. There are certain exceptions to this outlined in the law. You also have a right to access your personal health information that is kept by a health care provider, again with some exceptions.

PLEA can provide you with information to help you understand many legal matters you, a family member or friend may be facing.

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Housing & Communities

Planning for the Future

Death & Estates

Health

Older Adults

Consumer Protection

Non-Profit Organizations & Charities

Debts & Credit

Courts & Legal System

Government Agencies

Crimes & Fines

Victims

About PLEA

PLEA gratefully acknowledges our primary core funder the Law Foundation of Saskatchewan for their continuing and generous support of our organization.