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Medical Treatment

Getting medical attention is very important for survivors of sexual assault both in the immediate aftermath of the assault and in the longer term. Sometimes survivors are reluctant to seek medical attention. They may fear having to talk about the assault or having invasive examinations.

In many areas there are people who are specially trained to help sexual assault survivors at the hospital. In many areas there are also sexual assault advocates who can attend and support you. Also, you can always bring a support person of your choice with you.

Q

If I am not physically injured do I still need to go to the hospital?

A

Even if you don’t think you are injured medical attention is needed to help ensure there are no long-term physical consequences, such as pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections, as a result of the assault.

Q

If I don’t want to report the assault should I still go to the hospital?

A

Yes. Medical attention is not just required to collect evidence. It is needed to treat any injuries and to provide preventative treatment if necessary.

Q

When should I go to the hospital?

A

You can seek medical attention any time after the assault but there are good reasons to seek medical attention immediately. There are treatments that can help prevent things such as pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections but they are only effective if treatment is started soon after the assault.

These treatments can include...

  • emergency contraceptives (“morning after pill”)
  • antibiotics to prevent infections
  • medications to reduce your risk in case you were exposed to HIV

At the Hospital

When sexual assault victims decide to go to a hospital, there are policies and procedures in place to ensure you get the help and treatment you need.

Follow-up Care

Victims may require ongoing support and medical treatment including counselling and testing for sexually transmitted infections.

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Housing & Communities

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Older Adults

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Non-Profit Organizations & Charities

Debts & Credit

Courts & Legal System

Government Agencies

Crimes & Fines

Victims

About PLEA

PLEA gratefully acknowledges our primary core funder the Law Foundation of Saskatchewan for their continuing and generous support of our organization.